Today In Charleston History: June 9

1739

“A Exact Prospect of Charlestown” an engraving based on a watercolor by Bishop Roberts, was printed in London and published in London Magazine.

An Exact Prospect of Charlestown, by Bishop Roberts

An Exact Prospect of Charlestown, by Bishop Roberts

1776-Battle of Ft. Sullivan-American Revolution

Learning of the construction of Ft. Sullivan, and the fact that the back (land) side of the fort was not completed, Sir Henry Clinton and 500 British soldiers landed on Long Island (present-day Isle of Palms) just north of Sullivan’s Island. Over the following days, Clinton increased his force on Long Island. His plan was to cross The Breach, an inlet between Long Island and Sullivan’s and attack the fort from its unfinished rear while Sir Peter Parker’s ships assaulted it from the sea.

 1818 – Religion-Slavery

Rev. Richard Allen, black minister from Philadelphia, conducted a service on Wednesday evening at the AME Church. The city guard was called out to break up the service. One hundred and forty black congregants were arrested – including Denmark Vesey, Peter Poyas, Monday Gell and Gullah Jack – and spent the night in jail. The next morning a judge lectured them on the particulars of the 1800 law that prohibited black religious meetings after dark with a black majority.

 1864-Bombardment of Charleston  

Gus Smythe, serving in the Confederate Signal Corps in Charleston, wrote to his mother:

Well the Yankees have succeeded at last in hitting St. Michael’s Church. NOT the steeple, just the base of it. The shell entered the South roof of the church on Tuesday, but did not burst nor do much damage … I do not consider the charm as broken now even until the Steeple itself receives a scratch

Today In Charleston History: June 7

1770

Lt. Gov.William Bull reported that 3000 wagons came to Charlestown in one year from the backcountry carrying produce.

1808
Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr, in the early 1800s

Former vice-president Aaron Burr left America on a British mail packet Clarissa Ann from New York under the alias Mr. G. H. Edwards. Although his trial for treason had ended in his acquittal, and he was never charged with murder for the illegal duel with Alexander Hamilton, he was unable to pursue any political or business ventures, so he headed to Europe.

He would never see his beloved daughter Theodosia Burr Alston again. He spent his last night with her working out an elaborate system of codes they would use to correspond. He was being watched constantly and there was a long line of creditors seeking him out.

1818-Slavery. Religion.
Rev. Richard Allen

Rev. Richard Allen

Rev. Richard Allen and a delegation from Philadelphia arrived in Charleston at the invitation of Rev. Morris Brown to support the local A.M.E. (African Methodist Episcopal) Church.

In 1794 Allen had founded the A.M.E. Church in Philadelphia, the first independent black denomination in the United States.  In 1816 he was elected the first bishop of the AME Church.

1862-Bombardment of Charleston

 The vestry of St. Michael’s met and passed a resolution for “the removal of the bells to a place of Safety.” They was real concern that the city may be taken by Federal troops, and burned. The bells were placed in the care of Mr. J.K. Sass, president of the Bank of Charleston in Columbia. Advertisements were placed in local papers for bids to remove the bells from the church.