A Review: Everybody Had An Ocean by William McKeen

31621229Didn’t learn a lot of “new” things reading this, but it’s a pretty comprehensive, journalistic overview of the underbelly of the “peace-love-surf” hippy music culture of the 60s – you know, the ones the media always claims was the greatest music ever. The book reconfirms many of my long held beliefs that half of those folks were not that talented, just a lucky product of the drug-induced culture at the time.

And, as if it wasn’t obvious to most folks already, it also reconfirmed that Mike Love is a lucky jerk and David Crosby and Jim Morrison were awful human beings. Good thing (for them) most of the awful acts these hippies inflicted upon the world was overshadowed by a legitimate evil – Charlie Manson and his family.

Charleston Night Market – March 16

eap - night market

STARTING FRIDAY, MARCH 16

East Atlantic Publishing will be Doin’ the Charleston in the Charleston Night Market each Friday and Saturday evening, 6:30 – 10:30 p.m.  Mark Jones and/or Rebel Sinclair will be manning a booth, and autographed copies all EAP books will be for sale. Come see us for a book, or conversation. If you have questions about Charleston history or culture, we’ll be glad to talk with you! 

LOCAL HISTORY – LOCAL AUTHORS

atomacon - mark and reb

Mark Jones & Rebel Sinclair

Lullaby, a Spenser Novel (A Review)

I’m not a fan of other writers taking over popular series after the death of the originating author. It always looks like a greedy grab by the author’s family. As a fan of the original Spenser novels by Robert B. Parker (well, the first 20 at least) and as a huge fan of Ace Atkins, I decided to give this one a try.

My first hope was that Atkins was smart enough to realize that the major problem with the later Spenser novels was the every-growing role of the most annoying character in crime fiction history, Susan Silverman. Another issue was that Hawk had been reduced to a walk-on caricature of his former brilliant presence.

13269092Too bad, Atkins stayed with the formula of the latter Spenser books. Spenser meets a client. Spenser has dinner or sex (both) with Susan where she uses her “brilliance as a therapist” to ask Spenser questions in which he impart his fears/concerns etc … Oh God … how tedious. I’m guessing that since Susan is obviously a romanticized version of Parker’s wife, Joan, that maybe Atkins was contractually obligated to make sure Susan has a large role. Any other reason makes no sense whatsoever.

I can safely say that I will not read any of the other Atkins-written Spenser novels. If I ever do read another Spenser novel, I’ll go back to the original 20. Here’s hoping Atkins gets creative and Susan Silverman gets killed in some creative way, which will jump start Spenser and Hawk back into their former selves and seek righteous retribution.

Not holding my breath.

2 palmettos

 

Tonight, FATE MAGAZINE RADIO SHOW

Tonight, at 9:00 p.m.

fate magazine radio


lovecraft memes - unitarian

Today In Charleston History, August 9

1792, August 9. Commerce. Culture. Theater.

The contract to construct the new theater for West and Bignall was given to Captain Anthony Toomer, with the understanding that the building was to be finished in January 1793.  The lot for the theater was a triangle parcel at Broad and Middleton streets, and the high ground of Savage’s Green (present-day New Street), purchased from Henry Middleton for £500 sterling.     

There is some evidence that the theater was designed by James Hoban, who had lived in Charleston for a couple of years while helping design and build the Charleston County Courthouse.

 

charleston theater, broad and new streets

Rendering of the New Theater at Savage’s Green, facing Broad Street (present day location of New and Broad Streets)