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Today In Charleston History: July 14

1837-Slavery

The Grimke sisters, Sarah and Angelina, embarked on a lecture tour across Massachusetts. In Amesbury they were challenged by John Page, a local man who had recently lived for several years in the South. He thought the slaves were “no worse off than the … manufacturers [factory workers]of the North.” Since most of the people in Amesbury worked in shoe manufacturing, their remarks created such an uproar that Angelina agreed to a public debate with Page.

1849-Religion. Slavery
James Petigru

James Petigru

On Saturday night, after the trial of Nicholas and two other ringleaders of the Work House escape, a mob gathered at City Hall to destroy the nearly completed black church on Beaufain Street, located a block from the Work House.  As the mob assembled, James L. Petrigru, an esteemed Charleston lawyer and member of St. Michael’s Church, stood on the city hall steps and addressed the mob. His efforts saved the church from destruction.

1903

Charleston City Council approved the purchase of the Rhett Farm for $35,000 to extend Hampton Park.

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